WG/Inflation themed 3v3 fighting card game thing

So, I’ve had this idea in my head for a while and I think now’s the time to go public with it, even though I don’t have much to show for it.

I’ve had this idea brewing in my head for a while now. In short it’s a game where players build teams of 3 characters and pit them against each other, themed around furry fetish antics.

So far my plan is to outline the basic concept fully, Create a base set consisting of about 200 cards, then port those cards into tabletop sim to playtest.

I’ve calculated the risks of doing such a thing. I’d need to take out a bank loan to get art for all the cards for one. Not something I can really do considering I’m currently making just above minimum wage.

I also have a terrible problem with not finishing things I start. I plan to break that streak with this, hopefully I won’t disappoint myself again but for now I can’t make any promises.

I’ll return to this thread once I have something to show, I’m mainly just gauging interest for now. I guess in the meantime you guys could help me come up with a name for this thing?

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Sounds like a good idea, would it play like Hearthstone?

I don’t think It will play anything like hearthstone. It’s mainly inspired by Library of Ruina and Slay the Spire, with various other mechanics lifted from other card games I’ve played.

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Whilst I am pleased to hear about a card game going in a new direction, I can’t help but feel a bit leery of hearing “… base set consisting of about 200 cards…” and then “I also have a terrible problem with not finishing things I start…” in the next breath. I don’t wish to disparage you or your ambitions here, but to avoid setting yourself up for a fall, overwhelmed with the prospect of balancing so many cards over so many characters (and that’s not even considering the other aspects of the game as a whole) a more planned approach should be in order.

Before running away with character and card designs, you’re going to want to focus on a proof of concept and for that you’re going to want to pare things down - like a lot. Firstly though, a quick comment on the core gameplay loop (ie, the moment-to-moment actions the players will be taking in your game) Thankfully the loop initially sounds solid - pick teams of characters and battle them - fair enough, so would I be correct in inferring that there will be two general phases of the gameplay loop, essentially “combat” and “out-of-combat”, the latter of which I assume would cater to deck management? If you envision the player doing more you will need to define this first and foremost. For now I will just work on these given assumptions.

So let’s start simply. In almost all deckbuilding card games, you have a set deck of starting cards. Slay the Spire, for example, boils down the 100+ card options to just 3-4: strike, defend and 1-2 signature cards. Other card games will have more complex setups that affect your starter deck, such as gear/equipment loadouts, but you are still ultimately presenting the player with a starter deck that not only a) keeps their starting decisions simple but also b) still manages to convey a style of play that is unique to that character, class etc.

It’s those 1-2 signature cards in Slay the Spire that define each character, and those card choices aren’t an accident or an afterthought. It’s taking the broad overture of the playstyles or strategies available to a given character and working backwards from that endpoint so as to give the player the starting means to intuit and pursue those strategic goals when it comes to deck building - I’m assuming in the “non-combat” phase of your gameplay loop there would be a focus on deck building or management.

Your proof of concept should start small. Take a single team of three, or heck even a single character. What cards would constitute their starting decks? Using this initial constraint will help focus on the basic functionality of combat (ie, what’s going on in a battle) and start guiding your hand in not only defining gameplay aspects, the characters etc but also give you a better foundation for when opening the floodgates for new card concepts and strategies. On top of this, have a consideration for the aforementioned “out-of-combat” phase. How do you see deck management working?

If you are able to construct and demonstrate a completely gameplay loop, showing the phases both in and out of combat, then that will give you a great foundation to start building the game up from there.

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I probably should have clarified that this is not going to be a video game, not yet. It’s going to be a card game played via tabletop simulator, later down the line our own online client, and in approximately 300 years, physically.

Otherwise, I do agree with your sentiment. Once I figure out how to load stuff into tabletop sim, I’ll come back with a visual demonstration of how the game is played, or at least the basic idea, so save your judgements till then.

Ah, well that in itself is interesting in a number of ways! Those who know me from WG’s Discord server may recognise how I like to scout for “appealing” mechanics and themes in tabletop, board and card games - games about out-competing your opponents for, alongside gaining and amassing, prized resources such as VPs can feel innately greedy and hoggish at times. I’ll be curious, and no doubt others here as well, to see how you incorporate the inflation/wg aspects into your game!

One of the benefits of a digital board game, outside of the A/V bells and whistles, is that a lot of the crunchy upkeep that can bog down physical play can be dealt with behind the curtain, freeing the players up to enjoy the experience more. Boardgamearena has practically transformed some games because of this ease of play.
The reason I bring up this point is that my gut reaction to this news is that unless the characters, and thus the gameplay itself, is sufficiently streamlined then having a player juggle three characters - and three times the overhead - might be a little challenging. An issue that disappears in a videogame which can track and handle adjustments quickly.

Of course this is all speculation without seeing the game in action, and hey, since this is a physical card game a prototype should be quick to assemble. Best of luck with your proof of concept!